Say Hello: 50 Simple and Effective Website Greeting Messages

by on 23rd June 2011 with 20 Comments

Placing a large greeting message at the top of your site is a great way to create a welcoming environment and provides the perfect opportunity to clearly state your purpose for being.

Today we’ve rounded up over fifty such messages for inspiration on both the message and visual appearance fronts. The greetings has been divided up into clear categories so you can analyze the different popular techniques being used by designers today.

Well Hello There

The greeting message is often the first thing that people see on a website. These types of messages are especially popular on personal portfolios but can be found across all genres of sites. The typical strategy is to create a large, attractive and attention-grabbing headline, often mixed in with some sort of graphic.

The tone can be friendly, comical, serious, or even self-righteous. Remember that in writing this message, you’re making your first impression on your visitor about the personality of your company. Needless to say, you don’t want to screw it up!

I’ve noticed several trends in how these messages are structured and have created a collection for you to browse through to find ideas for your own welcome message. It’s up to you to decide what you think will and won’t work with your visitors, but each of the categories below represents a tried and true method, usually structured to make visitors feel instantly welcome.

Hello

What’s more friendly that a simple “hello”? This is probably the most common trend that I come across and is simply everywhere in designer portfolios these days. The idea is of course to make the site seem that much more alive and friendly, as if it’s a person welcoming you in. This is often effective when combined with a photo or illustration of the designer so it’s clear who the message is coming from.

World of Ehab Aref Design

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Andrew Zellinger

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CMYK08

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InCub

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Tim Potter

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Rangus

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The City Is Burning

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Deez Harman

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Farrkling

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Web Effectual

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Dave Wilkinson

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Federica Cau

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Masswerks

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Stu Greenham

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DeadFemme

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RockstarWorking

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Capacitr, Inc.

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Julian Laval

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Andrew Ckor

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Pierre Saikali

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We Make

Another popular headline to slap on the homepage skips the formal greeting and goes straight into the information you need to know: what the company does. For portfolios, this is often a message about what the company makes, designs, creates, etc.

This helps you effectively target your customers right off the bat. For example, if you’re looking for a UI specialist and the site header says “we make gorgeous and functional interfaces”, you immediately know that you’re on the right track. This helps you carve out a little niche that other sites might cover but don’t specifically target in the verbiage.

Karmon French

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Swwweet

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Really Simple

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Rimits

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Zhng Design Studio

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Bestwork Consulting inc.

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383 Project

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We Are

This section uses a very similar technique to the last one. Here, the identity is a bit more personalized though. Instead of stating what the company makes, these headlines state who the company is. It’s a subtle difference but an interesting one that may come off as slightly friendlier.

Tapp3 Media

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Bit This!

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Konsebt

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Wopro

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Unfold

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Simple as Milk

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WebzGuru

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TH= SUM

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Every Pixel Counts

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Make Me Believe

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AbsolutMedia

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We Love

This one is a little more rare than the others so I only have a couple of examples, but it’s definitely worth noting. The famous “I love NY” campaign with the heart symbol has made this phrasing extremely popular in all industries. Instead of directly saying who they are, these companies tell you what they love, which instills a sense of passion that makes you confident that they enjoy and take pride in what they do enough to get the job done right.

Piccirilli Dorsey

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Safarista Design

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Other

Remember as you look through these examples that you don’t have to follow the crowd. Make your greeting message your own and strike off in an unexpected direction. Make it friendly, playful, sarcastic; whatever genuinely reflects you or your client. Here are a few examples for inspiration.

Henry Brown

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Jarad Johnson

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Coreymade

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Andrew Lebowitz

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Ashfall Design

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Mobilezr

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This Is Teixido

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Viccolla

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Owl Republic

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Rahul

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We Came From Mars

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Show Us Yours!

Do you have a uniquely awesome greeting message on your site? Leave a comment below with a link so we can check it out! As always, thanks for reading Design Shack.

Comments & Discussion

20 Comments

Comments & Discussion

20 Comments

  1. Mark says:

    Awesome collection.

  2. Marlou says:

    What a great idea! Thanks for this :)

  3. This is great! I did this on my site too, it adds a little more personality to the site ;)

  4. Martin Lucas says:

    Great idea for a list post. I go with “Hello there” on my site!

  5. Emrico says:

    All this proves is that half the ‘designers’ out there are just blindly following trends.

  6. E says:

    @Emrico

    I suppose putting a menu on the website is too mainstream as well? Might as well let the user guess where your portfolio is by typing in random extensions to your URL. You could track how many times people get it wrong and cut yourself for each.

  7. Gene says:

    Great list. It’s nice way for designers to work in their personality into their designs. Nice touch that makes designs more human.

  8. Great showcase of greeting messages. I agree that it’s one of the main ways to communicate the tone and personality of a brand/website. They really can make or break designs.

  9. Nikki says:

    Nice article! Honestly I had a hard time picking a greeting line for my website, and seeing as to how friendly and polite “hello” seems to be, I stuck with it too. And it’s really a flexible greeting for various types of visuals. :)

  10. Thanks for the mention! When you’re stuck for logo ideas, a big bold HELLO works perfectly.

  11. Great showcase. I was looking for something like this a while ago, while working on a single-page personal branding type of website. It’s done now, and I came to a lot of the same conclusions: “Hello, I am [X] and I do [Y].” seems to work well, especially when coupled with large images. Of course, this doesn’t work, so well for, say, a school.

    Cool collection, though.
    Pity there are so many out there nowadays, that some really cool ones just never get noticed… :)

  12. very nice design and greetings

  13. Lars Mielke says:

    I really like this collection, though I am not the guy, woh prefers the “I am …” – style. People mostly want to know, what you can do for you (considering, it is an business website), not who you are.

  14. RAHUL says:

    Thanks for the listing rahult.com :)

  15. RAHUL says:

    Thanks Joshua Johnson :)

  16. Jesse says:

    I’m with Emrico on this. All of this stuff looks the same to me. Even the different wording people use isn’t really different. And I would disagree with E’s idea that all sites having a menu is on the same level as something like this. Navigation is a need, and while branding and identification is also a need, these are all very “samey”. Unfortunately, roundups like this only make the problem worse by giving other designers the impression that this is how you make a good greeting, or whatever.

  17. Jenni says:

    It’s amazing how many of these beautiful designs are ruined with tacky-sounding phrases! Some good ones too though :)

  18. Camille says:

    I have to agree with Emrico as well, in a way.

    I’m someone who looks at a lot of portfolios for inspiration and eventually these kinds of greetings became very clichéd and brought no sense of originality. The more I become aware of how overused these trends are, the less appealing they become to me. It’s hard to blame the people who use them however – I myself used to be one of those trend-followers. There is a very ambiguous area between being inspired by something and being a “sheep”. True originality is very rare these days, but all the more credit to those who can pull it off.

    There are a few in this article which are unique enough to still appeal to me, however.

  19. Kyle says:

    it’s just text.. but funny me thinks…

  20. JD says:

    I agree with Emrico on this. The majority of graphic designers out there now are just sheep, blindly following every trend. I’m proud to be different – and guess what.. i don’t use a mac.

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