Typography Archive

kinetic-type

Kinetic Typography: An Introductory Guide

kinetic type

Kinetic typography seems to be everywhere these days. From television commercials to website landing pages, movable type is a popular visual tool. This popularity could come from a number of reasons but one obvious factor is that it catches your attention. People tend to be drawn to words and want to read them.

Kinetic typography puts this together with some simple animations to create words that move on the screen, grabbing your attention and engaging the senses. So let’s take a look at kinetic typography and how you can integrate it into some of your design projects. (Note: The examples in this article include animation; click the images for links to the original sources to see them in action.)

October 22nd, 2014 Posted in Typography
type-hierarchy-lede

Every Design Needs Three Levels of Typographic Hierarchy

type

One of the most important elements for people looking at anything you design is the type. It needs to be clear and readable and it should direct users through a design, from most important elements to least.

And that, in a nutshell, explains typography hierarchy. But to really master the art of type, you need to understand how to layer type throughout a design to achieve maximum impact. Read on to learn how to master typography hierarchy and create effective type in every project.

September 15th, 2014 Posted in Typography
font-license

What Is a Font License? (And Do I Need One?)

font license

Almost every design project you encounter will include type of some kind. And it’s very likely that that type will start as a font on a computer, unless you create it yourself. With using specific computer fonts, come some very specific rules regarding their use, which can vary by project.

So what is a font license? Do you need one? And where can you find the tools and resources you need to make sure you are using fonts properly? Lucky for you, we have a primer. (And the images in this post include fonts that you can license to use in your projects.)

September 2nd, 2014 Posted in Typography
characters-lede

The Complete Guide to Special Characters

special characters

Not everything is as easy as ABC or 123. Sometimes your copy might require a character outside of the basic alphabet. That’s where special characters and glyphs come in. (Look around, they are more common than you might think at first.)

Depending on your workflow, inserting a glyph can be as simple as a keystroke or a multi-step process. Much of it depends on the software you are using, typography palette and how the final product will be published. Here, we are going to take a look at special characters, examples of use and tips for success.

April 21st, 2014 Posted in Typography
wid-april4

This Week in Design: April 4, 2014

week in design

From a teen who made headlines about saving millions of dollars with a font to some of the most impressive design names of our generation, this week in design featured people who make an impact. Whether you like or agree with a theory sometimes does not mean as much as the simple idea that it gets people thinking about something new.

Every week, we plan to a look at major product releases and upgrades, tools and tricks and even some of the most popular things you are talking about on social media. And we’d love to hear what’s going on in your world as well. Have we missed anything? Drop me a line at carrie@designshack.net.

April 4th, 2014 Posted in Typography
mobile-type-lede

Tips for Designing Better Mobile Typography

mobile type

Mobile is big right now. But often the typography is small. When it comes to creating great type on small screens, there are plenty of challenges.

So how can you make the most of responsiveness, mobile design and typography? The first step is really understanding type and the second is by thinking about how people read. Put the two together and you will get a handle on creating great mobile type in no time. It’s a skill that every designer needs to master in the digital age.

March 5th, 2014 Posted in Typography
hierarchy-lede

Creating Visual Hierarchy With Typography

type hierarchy

Visual hierarchy is an important element in any design project. It tells people where to look and what things on the screen or printed page are most important. Hierarchy gives readers a sense of how to actually read material from start to finish with visual cues and flow.

While you can create visual hierarchy using a number of different tools, today we are going to look at ways to create structure with just typography. (And take a look at the images used throughout this post; they are all examples of great type hierarchy in action.)

March 3rd, 2014 Posted in Typography
amp-lede

Why I Love Ampersands & You Should Too

ampersands

Without a doubt, the most beautiful character in the English language is the ampersand. The single character comes in so many fashions – from the simple & to the casual E- to t-style representations.

But where did this character come from? What does it mean? And most importantly how can you take advantage of using it in your design projects? Here we will take a look at my favorite character from its history to uses and a gallery of great ampersands to inspire you.

February 10th, 2014 Posted in Typography
serifsVsans

Serif vs. Sans Serif Fonts: Is One Really Better Than the Other?

screenshot

There is an ongoing debate among designers – both print and digital – about what makes an ideal typeface for a project. The debate almost always breaks down to a single question: serif or sans serif?

Before you answer that question, think about all of the things you know about serif and sans serif typefaces and all the myths associated with them. Today, we’ll take a look at both categories of type and try to determine if one is really better than the other, and in what circumstance.

October 28th, 2013 Posted in Typography
readability-lede

The Importance of Designing for Readability

readability

Text is not an afterthought in the design process. It should be your first consideration.

Readability should be one of the top concerns when it comes to any design project. If text can’t be read, then why are you designing in the first place? Good design delivers content in a way that is understandable; readability is a big part of comprehension. Today we’ll be discussing how you can plan a design around the words, so that your projects are easy to read.

July 22nd, 2013 Posted in Typography
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