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Mastering Markdown: 30 Resources, Apps and Tutorials to Get You Started
HTML / 23 Aug 2011

Mastering Markdown: 30 Resources, Apps and Tutorials to Get You Started

If you’re like me, learning Markdown has been on your todo list for months. I finally took the plunge and instantly became addicted to sorting through the wealth of resources, apps and other Markdown related materials available.

The following is a collection of the best Markdown resources that I’ve found. Whether you’re a complete Markdown newbie looking to learn the syntax or a seasoned expert in the market for a new iPad app, you’ll find something here that’s perfect for your needs.

Should Web Designers Know Code? Finding Compromise in a Tired Debate
CSS / 22 Aug 2011

Should Web Designers Know Code? Finding Compromise in a Tired Debate

Should web designers understand basic HTML and CSS? It’s a tired argument with two sides that refuse to yield, why even discuss it?

The purpose of this article is not to prove which group is right but to attempt to show that both sides do indeed make valid points and to see if analyzing these points brings us to a compromise that both parties can agree on.

Why Adobe Doesn’t Understand Web Designers
Software / 18 Aug 2011

Why Adobe Doesn’t Understand Web Designers

Earlier this week Adobe launched a preview of a WYSISYG web design project currently codenamed “Muse.” Though it looked promising, disappointed and even angry reactions from the web community are already all over the web.

With all the time, effort and money that Adobe spends on creating a “code free” solution for designing websites, you’d think that they would be able to create something decently usable by now. So what’s holding them back? Today we’ll take a brief walk down memory lane, starting all the way back at PageMill, to see if we can discover any reoccurring themes in Adobe’s history with web designers.

The Difference Between UI and UX
Graphics / 15 Aug 2011

The Difference Between UI and UX

In today’s creative and technical environment, the terms “UI” (User Interface) and “UX” (User Experience) are being used more than ever. Overall, these terms are referring to specialties and ideas that have been around for years prior to the introduction of the abbreviated terminology.

But the problem with these new abbreviations is more than just nomenclature. Unfortunately, the terms are quickly becoming dangerous buzzwords: using these terms imprecisely and in often completely inappropriate situations is a constant problem for a growing number of professionals, including: designers, job seekers, and product development specialists. Understanding the proper separation, relationship and usage of the terms is essential to both disciplines.