Category: HTML

Categories

7 Convincing Reasons to Try Designing in the Open
Graphics / 5 Mar 2010

7 Convincing Reasons to Try Designing in the Open

Designing out in the open can be quite intimidating.

You’re basically swinging the doors open wide and hanging up a huge sign that says “Harsh Criticism Wanted.” However, the benefits of utilizing this particularly transparent method of design can often outweigh the grievances.

Today we’ll look at seven reasons to consider designing your next project in the open.

Why You Should Build a Front End Package
CSS / 12 Feb 2010

Why You Should Build a Front End Package

How do you begin building a website?

The majority of developers probably start from scratch or pull in a few resources from previous sites. The more organized among us have developed a custom toolbox from which to begin a site that proves to be an essential part of their workflow.

Today we’ll discuss why you should consider building your own front end package to serve as a starting point for every single site you create.

15 Tips for Designing Terrific Tables
CSS / 26 Jan 2010

15 Tips for Designing Terrific Tables

Tables of information are boring.

In a sense, they’re meant to be that way. A good table communicates a lot of information in a concise, easy to understand way. Because the emphasis really should be on the information, over-designing a table can kill the effectiveness. However, in the right hands, clever design can not only make a table more attractive, but can actually increase readability.

Today we’ll take a look at several ways you can improve the functionality and aesthetics of your tables. One of the most common places we currently find tables online is on a web app’s pricing page so most of our examples will take this form, just keep in mind that these principles can apply to any type of informative grid (whether or not it’s actually a

).

How to Build a Site With Keyboard Navigation: PSD to HTML
Accessibility / 30 Nov 2009

How to Build a Site With Keyboard Navigation: PSD to HTML

Today we’ll be looking at how to add keyboard navigation to a website using a few simple lines of JavaScript. First we’ll create a simple site theme in Photoshop and then transform it into a working website that uses keyboard functions to switch pages.

Create a Beautiful CSS Menu
CSS / 20 Nov 2009

Create a Beautiful CSS Menu

Today we’re going to create a working horizontal CSS menu from scratch. We’ll be using transparent PNGs (sorry outdated browser users) to create a glossy horizontal bar, the color of which can easily be changed using only CSS. Before we get started, check out what we’ll be building in the live demo.

Four Quick and Easy Ways to Embed MP3 Files Into Your Site
HTML / 10 Nov 2009

Four Quick and Easy Ways to Embed MP3 Files Into Your Site

Once upon a time I was in a rock band. When I was building our website, I naturally wanted to put some music up so visitors could listen before purchasing our songs on iTunes. After a bit of research I found out that there are a million ways you could go about it, some better than others. Sadly, after two albums and lots of good times, my band The Van Buren Regulars no longer exists. Fortunately, what I learned about embedding music lives on and is easy enough to pass along.

Today we’re going to look at four easy ways to embed MP3 files into your website. All of these methods are free and take mere minutes to implement. Let’s check them out!

HTML5: Get It Working Today (4 of 4)
HTML / 26 Oct 2009

HTML5: Get It Working Today (4 of 4)

This will be the final article in our series on HTML5. This go around we’ll have a brief look at which new HTML5 technologies major browsers are officially supporting and go over some techniques you can use to take advantage of the new elements in your coding today. Finally, we’ll discuss how you should start preparing to support HTML5 in all the sites you build from here forward.

HTML5: Semantic Changes (3 of 4)
HTML / 23 Oct 2009

HTML5: Semantic Changes (3 of 4)

In the last article, we looked at a number of new elements introduced in HTML5 and how to implement them properly. In this article, we’ll again be discussing a set of new elements but this time we’ll be examining only those HTML5 elements that represent a significant semantic change to the way you structure your sites. This article will cover how to use each of these new elements in a way that will bring much needed relief to the div-itus that plagues the structure of so many sites today.

HTML5: New Elements (2 of 4)
HTML / 21 Oct 2009

HTML5: New Elements (2 of 4)

A couple of days ago we posted an introduction to HTML5 and briefly covered some of the content we’ll be outlining in this series. Today’s post, which is the second in the series of four, will take a look at how to use six of the new elements in HTML5: canvas, article, audio, video, meter, and mark.

Keep in mind that HTML5 is not exactly ready for widespread use – so don’t go changing anything on your site quite yet. Be assured that HTML5 is in fact coming soon, therefore these concepts may prove useful in the near future.

HTML5: The Basics (1 of 4)
HTML / 19 Oct 2009

HTML5: The Basics (1 of 4)

The next iteration of HTML has been met with excitement by some, loathing by others and confusion/fear by everyone else. Love it or hate it, HTML 5 will soon define how you build websites. This is the first article in a four part series that will introduce HTML5 and its basic features as well as explain the key differences from HTML4.01 and XHTML 1.0 so you can start preparing yourself and your sites for the transition. Over the next week we’ll be focusing on three major areas:

1. New Elements
2. Semantic Changes
3. Getting it Working Today

This article will briefly introduce each of these topics to prepare you for the in-depth articles ahead.

How to Use TypeKit on Your Site: Step-by-Step
CSS / 14 Oct 2009

How to Use TypeKit on Your Site: Step-by-Step

Several options have cropped up recently for adding custom fonts to your website by utilizing the @font-face selector. TypeKit is an exciting new player in this game because it stands out in two key areas: ease of use and richness of fonts available. This tutorial will take you through several small, super simple steps to get TypeKit up and running on your site. You won’t find any advanced techniques or scripting here, so even if you’re a novice web designer this should be a cinch!

The Footer Copyright Notice
Articles / 8 Jul 2008

The Footer Copyright Notice

Copyright Footer NoticeAlmost all websites contain some sort of copyright notice in their footer (e.g. Copyright © 2008 Apple Inc. All rights reserved.). But what’s the best way to do this? We’re going to take you through the requirements for your copyright notice, and a nifty JS (or PHP) trick for ensuring that your copyright year is always up to date.

What’s required?

The humble copyright notice is always useful to show in the footer, as a way of stating your claim over a site. Interestingly, however, it is not required for you to have copyright over the graphics, content and artwork of your site. This comes into place as soon as you’ve created the content and placed it in the public domain. Placing a copyright notice is still advisable to deter potential plagiarists and stake your claim. The generally accepted format is:

Copyright © 2008 Design Shack

There are a couple of points to make:

  • Make sure that the year is current (see below)
  • Use the HTML code © to display the copyright symbol, ensuring that your site’s XHTML is valid
  • Ensure the word ‘copyright’ appears

If you have specific requirements for how people can use certain content of your site, using a Creative Commons License would be advised. This allows you to select how content can be used in a more official and controlled manner.

Future proof

When creating a website, it can be incredibly tempting to simply drop in the basic requirements, and not think too heavily about future proofing your site. One of the most telling signs that a site isn’t regularly updated is an out of date copyright year. This can be very easily made automatic, through the use of a simple piece of PHP or JS code:

Alternatively, if you would prefer to use JavaScript, the following works well:

Stick with one of these methods, and you’ll never be kicking yourself in February again for not updating the copyright year!

0 0 0 0